Exactly The Same . Just Different

Can’t Stand Me

Play the music while your reading if you wish.

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My view riding to the gym.

I have a few bike blogging friends who have been riding in the snow for a couple of weeks. I  read their stories and shake my head thinking, I’m too old for that and really don’t feel like riding in snow.  I tell people that I might if it snowed, but didn’t really mean it. Well, it snowed last night. Continue reading “Exactly The Same . Just Different”

Symmetry

In response to The Daily Post’s writing prompt: “Symmetry.”

Cover Photo.   Many of the area homes have ice sculptures of varying size and shapes.

As always, click any photo for big. Click again for bigger

IMG_0207She looks both intrigued and proud.  Below is why.

The past week was a meet the parents holiday.  Brandon and his lady Janae, traveled from Austin, Texas to Fairhaven, MA (which we now call Alaskachusetts), just in time for the second major blizzard to hit the area.  Because there was so much snow from the previous storm, we were running out of places to put new stuff.  Janae was in awe of her man looking like he was working in a coal mine.  Little did she know that this storm dumped a foot of new powder that was no heavier than fairy dust.

Taking a break
Taking a break

A note about my recent postings.

Most of my musings are bike riding and bike touring posts.  Being snow bound allows me to take online courses to help make my writing, photos and videos better and more interesting.  The Daily Post does a weekly photo challenge that suggests a theme for participants.

A Funny Thing Happened While Digging Out From The Latest Snowstorm

Cover photo above author unknown
New Bedford snow blower waist deep

As always, click any photo for big. Click again for bigger.

Snowstorms, hurricanes, volcanoes, earthquakes, floods and stuff like that happen all the time. These are just part of nature and are no big deal. Until of course when humans are added to the equation. Then these natural phenomenon become disasters.

The past two weeks of blizzards and daily snow squalls for a while seemed like disasters. Now however, people have realized that although there is a lot of snow around, it’s really not causing much havoc. The roads are clear, the supermarkets have plenty of milk and bread. Gas is plentiful and it’s winter break for the schools.Now when we are walking or driving, it’s like being in a maze.  Check out some of the astonishing Boston photos below by clicking the link.

Icicles are the norm
Icicles are the norm

Stone building in blizzard New Bedford

Even the dogs like to look at the snow
Even the dogs like to look at the snow

Life is pretty much back to normal within a few hours of a blizzard. Because the temperature is so cold, the snow is very light. Kind of like fairy dust. It’s easy to plow and shovel. The only problem is that there is no longer any room to put what gets plowed and shoveled. Cities have resorted to trucking the snow to open spaces and rivers.

HERE are some astonishing photos from Boston.

More Snow

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Winter is usually a medium inconvienience here on the south coast of Massachusetts.  Usually a moderate snowfall is long gone within a few days and bicycle riders especially bike commuters have few complaints.  This year however is very unfriendly to bicycling.  Boston for example has accumulated over six feet of snow. The constant cold has prevented any snow-melt between storms and the city has run out of places to put the white stuff.  Boston has resorted to trucking the snow to be dumped in the river.

bike 2015 blizzard

The SouthCoast of Massachusetts has fared much better having only accumulated thirty inches, more or less. One of the consequences is that everything and everyone has slowed down and there is very little complaining.  “It snowed a lot but it will melt in time” is the battle cry for now.

It’s not unusual to get a few feet of snow annually.  What is unusual is to have it all at once with no melting between storms. It’s winter and the four seasons is why we live here.  Snow is part of the lifestyle, and we wouldn’t have it any other way.