Tag: Washington Secondary Bike Path

Forty Miles, Four Towns, Five MUPs in Rhode Island

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Enjoying a sunny summer bike ride in Rhode Island

The Washington Secondary Bike Path is the state’s longest bike path at 19 miles from Cranston Street in Cranston to Log Bridge Road, just past Route 102, in western Coventry. It is named for the abandoned rail corridor once served by the Providence, Hartford, & Fishkill Railroad.

The path is often referred to locally by the segment names given as the path was built, and these include, from west to east: Trestle Trail, Coventry Greenway, West Warwick Greenway, Warwick Bike Path, and Cranston Bike Path.

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One of the RR bridges converted to MUPs

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Trestle Trail in Coventry R.I.
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West Warwick, R.I.
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Lunch in Coventry, R.I. on the Connecticut border.
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40 miles, 4 cities, 5 bike paths

Washington Secondary Bike Path In Rhode Island

I knew that the path was extended but didn’t know the distance.  Jason and I drove to Loews in Cranston, RI to ride the four connecting paths that form the Washington Secondary Bike Path.  Cranston, Warwick, Coventry and the Trestle path  R.I.  It took us 20 miles to the Connecticut border and the town of Sterling.

The trail is a rails to trails conversion that insures it is 20 miles of flat riding. At the head of the trail in Coventry is an old time General Store which had a great deli serving fresh meats and breads.  It also sold bait that guaranteed to catch a fish or die trying. If you needed a bale of hay or a pound of Maxwell house coffee, this is the place to go.

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You can get anything you want…at Summit General Store. (In Coventry R.I. at the end of the Trestle Bike Path)

The path travels along the Pawtuxet River which is lined with old mills that used the river for power. Washington Secondary 014

We saw quite a few characters on this ride that all had great stories I’m sure. We did not make first contact on this day so there are no stories to report.  To qualify, I sometimes strike up a conversation, take photos and write articles for Rails to Trails “Trail Link”, like the one I wrote, HERE three years ago.  It may be time for and updated review unless someone has beat me to it.